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Have you heard of geocaching?

Surely you have? If you haven’t – welcome to a whole new world.

A sample small geocache, containing a pencil, a logbook for finders to sign, batteries and toys (which finders may take, leaving in exchange items they bring), and a travel bug, which may be tracked online as it moves from cache to cache across the country or around the world.
A sample small geocache, containing a pencil, a logbook for finders to sign, batteries and toys (which finders may take, leaving in exchange items they bring), and a travel bug, which may be tracked online as it moves from cache to cache across the country or around the world.

‘Geocaching is a treasure hunt with something for everyone. Using map coordinates and a GPS enabled device, you can find a geocache near your home, in the city, in the bush or in Antarctica.
Geocaches come in all shapes and sizes too. You can find a tiny little one as small as your fingernail, or a huge geocache with exciting ‘treasures’ inside. It can be as easy or as hard as you like to make it. You can drive up to your geocache and spot it from the car, or you can choose to hike for miles up and down mountains in the snow in search of that elusive container.
Now get out there and have some fun! But beware, it can be addictive!’

What else is there to know about geocaching?
  • Geocaches are rated according to a scale that measures their difficulty to find and terrain where the cache is located or the terrain you need to traverse to get to the geocache site.
  • Finding a difficulty 1 geocache should take only a few moments, a difficulty 2 or 3 may take you 15 minutes to an hour searching for the geocache itself whereas a difficulty 5 may takes some weeks of puzzle solving.
  • A terrain 1 geocache should be able to be found by someone in a wheelchair or crutches whereas a terrrain 5 may require abseiling, tree climbing or other specialised skills like diving.
  • Geocaches also have a size ranging from nano through to large and all sizes in between.
  • Finding a nano geocache which can be smaller than your fingernail can be a significant challenge, a small is around 200ml and may take a little while to think through where it may be hidden whereas finding a large which is generally 20 litres or larger shouldn’t be too troublesome at all.
  • When searching for your first few geocaches, choose a traditional cache type where the difficulty is low, the terrain is low and the size is small or larger.
  • You should also check the latest logs from the geocache page itself to make sure that there are no unattended issues with the geocache and that it hasn’t recently been reported as missing.
  • Be environmentally concious when searching for a geocache. You may be searching in some creatures home. Do not rip or shred the area. Be gentle and kind to the environment. If you can’t find the geocache don’t take it out on the rocks, plants, trees or creatures that may be living nearby.

http://geocaching.com.au/

See you out there!!

T x

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